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CASE REPORT
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 25-27

Biological restoration – Nature's own alternative for primary care


1 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University Dental College and Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University Dental College and Hospital, Sangli, Maharashtra, India
3 Private Consultant Pediatric and Preventive Dentist, New Delhi, India
4 Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University Dental College and Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Krishna Patil
Department of Pedodontics, Bharati Vidyapeeth Dental College and Hospital, Sangli, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sidj.sidj_12_21

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In humans, especially in childhood, the more prevalent disease is dental caries. Dental caries can extensively destroy the tooth structure. Extensive loss of the tooth structure and premature loss of the primary tooth can lead to loss of vertical dimension, developing habits such as tongue thrusting and mouth breathing that may lead to malocclusion in future. The treatment of mutilated primary teeth should adequately reestablish the anatomy of the tooth, which helps to maintain the mastication, phonation, esthetics, and acts as a natural space maintainer. It is always challenging for the pediatric dentist to satisfactorily restore these teeth to maintain space, esthetics, and function. In recent years, both children and their parents have given priority to esthetics over primary dental care. This demands the innovation and the development of newer treatment options that should be biological and conservative. Hence, natural teeth are increasingly being used as a restorative material to treat damaged teeth with this desire for innovation. As a result, here we report a case of a severely mutilated primary tooth of a 2½-year-old child treated with the technique of biological restoration. This biological restoration procedure involves bonding a sterile dental structure to a tooth that needs treatment.


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